Thursday, September 17, 2015

17th September

Hi everyone. Today has been the second day of Social Sciences, but for me, and I don’t know if for everyone else too, this lesson has been the first one, because the other one was only to meet each other and to talk a little bit about what this term is going to be like. In my opinion, the blog is a very good idea, because we can check and review every content we’ve studied, but this reply is not to say my opinion. Well, perhaps in some aspects, but I think this is not the best moment.

At the beginning of the lesson, Paqui has showed us her new friend called Andrei. Apparently, the “real” Andrei gave her his wrong email address, and Paqui has contacted with another man who’s called with the same name. It seems that this is not the first time this man appears in Paqui’s inbox, because in 2nd ESO Andrei did the same. Well, who knows, perhaps this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship between Paqui and him.

(Mini P.D.: Andrei, don’t forget the name of your email account anymore.)

Today we’ve started with “unit 1”. In reality, “The 16th and 17th centuries” are units 8 and 9 from the 3rd ESO’s book, but as we didn’t learn it in 2nd ESO, we’re studying it now, but joined in only one unit. I prefer to study it and to go on with the 4th ESOS’s content better than forget about it and start learning something that doesn’t connect with our knowledge of 2nd ESO, I don’t know if you follow what I want to say.

Anyway. We’ve copied the index of this unit full of kings, reigns, territories and, naturally, history. The first part talks mostly about the 16th century, where we can see the Hispanic Monarchy under the  Habsburg dynasty with Charles I and Philip II, and also the 17th century decline with Charles II, Philip III and IV’s. In this first part we are going to work in groups of 3/4 people and what we have to do is a project which consists of a board game. I think we’re going to have a lot of fun, playing and learning at the same time.

In the second part of the index, there is information about the 17th century, like its crisis, the Thirty Year’s War, the absolute monarchy, the English revolutions and some content of culture and art. In the Baroque Art, we have to prepare an individual project. I think it will be interesting.
We’ve also started talking about Charles I, his family, the territories he had and some curious things about his life. Did you know that he became king at the age of five? No? Neither did I, so don’t worry. I can’t understand why people let children govern a kingdom, even if they were oriented by his court or the people who had to make the decisions on the child king behalf.


As I’ve heard in class, Charles’ family was a little bit unlucky. Why? Well, a lot of members died, but not because of the advanced age. I mean, perhaps there was someone who did, but the rest passed away because of illnesses, or I don’t know why, but I’m sure that if Paqui’s said that they didn't have much luck; it is because there was something here that didn’t work.
Here is the Family Tree that Paqui has showed us in class.


Well, as I was saying (sorry, I go on and on very frequently), some members of Charles’ family died, so Charles I inherited a lot of territories like the Indies, Castile, some territories in the north of Africa and the Canary Islands from his mother Joanna the Mad, Aragon, Sardinia, Sicily and Naples from his grandfather Ferdinand of Aragón, Burgundy territories from his father Philip the Handsome and the Austrian territories from his other grandfather Maximilian of Habsburg.



We’ve seen the conquest of the American territories superficially, the Aztecs, the Incas, etc. In the glossary, we’ve copied some words like hegemony and supremacy. The difference between them is that hegemony is the political, economic, or military predominance or control of one state over others and supremacy is the domination of one group over another one.

And with this, I've ended my journal. See you next time. Thanks for reading.

6 comments:

Lucía Villafranca said...

As you have said, today Paqui has explained Charles I's life (or Charles V's, if we talk about Germany). I think that you have summarized very good what we have learned today (Charles I's heritage, his family tree, his bad luck because of the deaths, etc). You have forgotten to say why Charles I started to rule at the age of five, because his father died but his mother was alive... but as you know, in this period women were unable to rule. Yes, it's a sad story.

See you in class friends! Bye :)

Lorena Alberca García said...

Thanks for you comment Lucía, but I've said that he started to rule at this age. Yeah, I've miss to say the reason, this is true, but I didn't remember hahaha. I wish Paqui explains us the conquered territories of America by the different characters of the European history in a deeper way. It seemed to be very interesting.

Paqui Pérez Fons said...

Hello girls,

Well done, Lorena. You've written a lot and almost everything is correct. I will let your classmates find some small mistakes you've made. If they don't tell them to you, I'll correct them for Monday, so don't forget to have a look on the comments to your post next week.

As for the content, Charles I didn't start ruling when he was 5. He became the heir of the Low Countries, Burgundy and Luxemburg when his father died, but his grandfather Maximilian ruled on his behalf and so did Ferdinand II the Catholic in Castile until his death. When Ferdinand died, he was 16 and he inherited Aragón too and as his mother Joanna was unable to rule, he proclaimed himself king of Castile too and became in charge of Castile, Aragón and the Low Countries...Later, when Maximilian died, he inherited the territories of Austria and the possibility of being elected emperor.

Good night!

AnDrEi Mihaila said...

Ohh my god! This is a very good journal. Well done Lore! For me this fist class was very exciting.. I think that this unit will be interesting. I'm curious to know why all the Charles' family died..It's a coincidence?

Lorena Alberca García said...

Thanks everyone and thanks Paqui to explain me another time the story of how Charles I took all these territories. On Monday we will see what happen.

Paqui Pérez Fons said...

Hello again,

These are my corrections:

- Erase the words in brackets and correct the words highlighted in black.

First paragraph

Today has been the second day of Social Sciences, but for me, and I don’t know if for everyone else too, this lesson has been the first one, because the other one was only to meet each other and to talk a little bit about what this term is going to be like . Today we’ve started with “unit 1”. In reality, “The 16th and 17th centuries” are units 8 and 9 from the 3rd ESO’s book, but as we didn’t learn it in 2nd ESO, we’re studying it now, but joined in only one unit.

Remember the expression "to be... like". For example "What is this... like? " (¿Cómo es...?)

Fifth paragraph

I can’t understand why people let children (to) govern a kingdom, even if they were oriented by his court or the people who had to make the decisions on the child king’s behalf.

"Let" desn't need "to" after it: "Let me explain", "Let me tell you"

Sixth paragraph

As I’ve heard in class, Charles’ family was a little bit unlucky. Why? Well, a lot of members died, but not because of their advanced age. I mean, perhaps there was someone who did, but the rest passed away because of illnesses, or I don’t know why, but I’m sure that if Paqui’s said that they dind’t have much luck;

You can say "be lucky" or "have much luck", but not only "have luck"

Seventh paragraph

Well, as I was saying (sorry, I go on and on very frequently), some members of Charles’ family died, so Charles I inherited a lot of territories like the Indies, Castile , some territories in the north of Africa and the Canary Islands from his mother Joanna the Mad, Aragón, Sardinia, Sicily and Naples from his grandfather Ferdinand of Aragón, Burgundy from his father Philip the Handsome and the Austrian territories from his other grandfather Maximilian of Habsburg.

Eighth paragraph

We’ve seen the conquest of the American territories superficially, the Aztecs, the Incas, etc.

The complement of manner goes after the direct complement. The order of complements is place, manner and time.

And the last line:

And with this, I’ve ended my journal. See you (the) next time.

That's all. These mistakes are not serious, but with these corrections your will improve your writing. Bye!